Stagi Concertinas

Stagi Concertinas

Description

Stagi Concertinas
We are a stockist of Stagi Concertinas these fine Italian concertinas. Handmade in Italy,the attention to detail is stunning. All theStagi concertinasare checked in our own workshop before shipping.

Concertinas
DEFINITION
Small free reed instrument from England, usually hexagonal in shape. there are three common keyboard layouts, each completely different to play on. Anglo, English and Duet (McCann, Crane, Jeffries and Hayden are all types of duet).

INTRODUCTION
The concertina was invented by Charles Wheatstone, and the earliest examples, which he called the symphonium, were made in 1829. Its huge popularity in the 19th century was diminished by the arrival of the piano accordion in the 20th. The folk revival has see the concertina back in demand, There are three quite different fingering systems in common use: Anglo, English, and Duet.

SOME TYPES OF CONCERTINA
Anglo Concertina | Duet Concertina | English Concertina

Anglo Concertina
Introduction: The Anglo is commonly used for dance-music, particularly Morris, and Irish music. It’s also used to accompany songs, shanties etc. Each button produces a different note on the push and draw of the bellows (so there are TWO notes per button). The high notes are on the right-hand end, the low on the left. So you can play the tune with the right hand, and vamp chords with the left.
Read the full Anglo Concertina FAQ Page.

Duet Concertina
Introduction: The Duet Concertina is probably the hardest to play, but the most versatile. Like the English, the same note plays in both directions, but like the Anglo, the treble notes are on the right hand end, and the bass notes on the left.
Read the full Duet Concertina FAQ Page.

English Concertina
Introduction: The English concertina is fully chromatic and each button plays the same note on both push and pull of the bellows. The scale comes by alternating notes from each end of the instrument, which makes it easy to play fast runs. This system tends to suit players who read music as the buttons line up exactly with written music with the stave lines on the left hand and spaces on the right.

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